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Security on wireless networks

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  #1  
Old 12-09-2008
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Security on wireless networks
  

Here are 4 basic rules for a "wireless" relatively secure.
  1. Change the default SSID
  2. Avoid broadcast SSID
  3. Encryption
  4. Filtering by MAC address
  5. Notes and thanks

Change the default SSID

By default, the network is called by the company that makes equipment. For example, a wireless router "link-sys" appoint its network link-sys. " We must change the name.

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  #2  
Old 12-09-2008
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Avoid broadcast SSID

The SSID broadcast option is turned on. This option sends every 2 seconds a message to all addresses ip (ip broadcast 255.255.255.255) saying: "I am a network and I'm ready."
By putting off this option, it prevents other aware of the existence of the network and possibly use it.
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  #3  
Old 12-09-2008
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Encryption

There are several types of encryption for Wi-Fi: Wep, Wpa and Wpa 2.
If you have a choice, prefer Wpa 2. And if you have the choice between several encryption (AES or TKIP), choose AES. If you experience compatibility problems, return to TKIP which is the standard of the first version of WPA.

As far as WEP, one can now assign a reference to the ridiculous. A key WEP was cracked within a few minutes with the right tools.
If you do not have a choice, it is best to choose a key 128-bit WEP. This will always be a first barrier.
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  #4  
Old 12-09-2008
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Re : Security on wireless networks

Filtering by MAC address

If your WiFi router allows it, enter the MAC address of each of your equipment in the router.
(The MAC address is unique to each WiFi device in the world.)
Thus, only WiFi devices reported in the router can connect.
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  #5  
Old 12-09-2008
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security WIFI ( 802.11 or Wifi )

let me Explain you the important concepts of security WIFI .
  1. An appropriate infrastructure
  2. Avoid defaults
  3. The MAC address filtering
  4. WEP - Wired Equivalent Privacy
  5. Improving authentication


An appropriate infrastructure

The first thing to do when setting up a wireless network is to position intelligently access points depending on the area you want to cover. It is not uncommon that the area is largely covered actually bigger than desired, in which case it is possible to reduce the power of the base station in order to adapt it to the area to cover.
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  #6  
Old 12-09-2008
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Avoid defaults

Avoid defaults

During the first installation of an access point, it is configured with default values, including as regards the password of the administrator. A large number of directors to consider grass only when it works it is unnecessary to alter the configuration of the access point. However, the default settings are such that security is minimal. It is therefore imperative to connect to the administration interface (usually via a web interface on a specific port of the base station) in particular to define a password hotel.

On the other hand, in order to connect to an access point it is essential to know the network identifier (SSID). Thus it is highly advisable to change the name of the default network and opt out (broadcast) from the latter on the network. Changing the default network ID is all the more important because it can give hackers the information on the make or model access point used.
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  #7  
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The MAC address filtering

The MAC address filtering

Each adapter r é bucket (generic name for the NIC) has a physical address of its own (called MAC address). This address is represented by 12-digit hexadecimal grouped in pairs and separated by dashes.

The access points generally in their configuration interface to manage a list of access rights (called ACL) based on MAC addresses equipment allowed them to connect the wireless network.

This precaution a little binding can limit network access to a number of machines. In return it does not solve the problem of confidentiality of exchanges.
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  #8  
Old 12-09-2008
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WEP - Wired Equivalent Privacy

WEP - Wired Equivalent Privacy

To address the problems of confidentiality of exchanges on networks without son, the 802.11 standard includes a simple mechanism for data encryption, it is the WEP, Wired equivalent privacy.

The WEP is a protocol for the encryption of 802.11 frames using RC4 symmetric algorithm with keys with a length of 64 bits or 128 bits. The principle of WEP is to define in a first time a secret key of 40 or 128 bits. This secret key must be declared at the access point and clients. The key is to create a pseudo-random number with a length equal to the length of the frame. Each data transmission is encrypted and using pseudo-random number as a mask through an exclusive OR between the pseudo-random number and the weft.

The session key shared by all stations is static, ie that to deploy a large number of stations WiFi it is necessary to configure using the same session key. Thus knowledge of the key is sufficient to decipher communications.

In addition, 24-bit key is used only for initialization, which means that only 40 bits of the key 64-bit really used to encrypt and 104 bits to 128 bits key.

In the case of the 40-bit key, an attack by brute force (ie trying all possible keys) can quickly bring the pirate to find the session key. In addition a flaw detected by Fluhrer, Mantin and Shamir on the generation of pseudo-random chain makes possible the discovery of the session key to storing 100 MB to 1 GB of traffic created intentionally.

The WEP is not sufficient to ensure effective data privacy. However, it is highly advisable to bring out at least a 128-bit WEP protection to ensure a level of confidentiality minimum and avoiding in this way 90% risk of intrusion.
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  #9  
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Improving authentication

Improving authentication

In order to more effectively manage the authentication, authorization and account management users (in English for AAA Authentication, Authorization, and Accounting) it is possible to use a server RADIUS (Remote Authentication Dial-In User Service). The RADIUS protocol (defined by RFC 2865 and 2866), is a client / server system to centrally manage user accounts and access privileges.
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  #10  
Old 25-10-2008
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Re: Security on wireless networks

can u please help i have wireless netgear router and my neighbours are using my network can u please send me step by step guide on how to put password on my router thank you u can email me at i would be grateful

Last edited by Yogesh : 08-04-2009 at 11:48 AM. Reason: Personal details removed. Use TechArena PM system instead.
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  #11  
Old 25-10-2008
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Re: Security on wireless networks

how to set up password for a lan network. this will help you to set the password on your router.
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  #12  
Old 25-10-2008
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Re: Security on wireless networks

Quote:
Originally Posted by sexykeks View Post
can u please help i have wireless netgear router and my neighbours are using my network can u please send me step by step guide on how to put password on my router thank you u can email me at i would be grateful
Which model of wireless netgear router are you using. Password setup for different versions of routers can be different. Please specify the router model for which exact password configuration can be adviced.
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  #13  
Old 25-10-2008
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cool Re: Security on wireless networks

i have netgear wireless router MR814 v 2tw hope this helps i have tried going on change advanced settings and then clickin on wpa and followin instructions but not doing it i must be doing something wrong i did set password up lastime but 4got how i removed password by resetting router by pressing in button at back had to do this coz someone got password(person who fixed my laptop gave it to all street lol)thats why i need to put new one on thanks hun 4 ur help
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  #14  
Old 27-10-2008
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Re: Security on wireless networks

Quote:
Originally Posted by sexykeks View Post
i have netgear wireless router MR814 v 2tw hope this helps i have tried going on change advanced settings and then clickin on wpa and followin instructions but not doing it i must be doing something wrong i did set password up lastime but 4got how i removed password by resetting router by pressing in button at back had to do this coz someone got password(person who fixed my laptop gave it to all street lol)thats why i need to put new one on thanks hun 4 ur help
Just get into your router and select Quick Setup from there and set the password for you router.
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