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SteelSeries 7G Keyboard

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  #1  
Old 12-03-2009
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SteelSeries 7G Keyboard
  

If you're a gamer, what sort of keyboard should you use? For discerning gamers who frequent tournaments, the keyboard is one of the most important. If you're looking for a keyboard with game-specific functions, you'll have to look elsewhere. The $150 7G keyboard from SteelSeries is really rather basic. There are no fancy LCD displays or custom key layouts, no differently shaped keys to place game functions at your fingertips, no macro recording or other fancy software tricks. It's just?a keyboard. Only this keyboard is focused on key action and construction quality.


SteelSeries are a Danish company with a mission to provide high quality accessories to gamers. They has introduced the new 7G Keyboard. At first glance the SteelSeries 7G may just seem like a plain keyboard with a standard layout and lack obvious luxuries. However picking up the 7G allows you to instantly realise there is something different about this one, it weighs a ton and is unbelievably solid.

There's absolutely no doubt in our minds the 7G is the most solidly built keyboard we've used, but the fact remains that pro gaming doesn't involve physical altercation. What, then, does the 7G offer for those seeking a gaming edge? SteelSeries focuses upon the 7G's claims of possessing the best anti-ghosting technology on the market. Whereas many standard keyboards will only recognize six to eight simultaneous keystrokes, the 7G can simultaneously accept commands from every one of its keys.

We can see some utility from this capability in capturing the true extent of player's frustration when smashing the keys after a bitter loss, but in our experience, we're not sure we've ever actually been constricted by the common six-key limits in any of our PC gaming. There are plenty of situations in which two to three commands are used at the same time, but seriously, when was the last time you needed to be simultaneously circle-strafing right (2-keys) while jumping (3-keys) and fully scop'ed(4-keys), while perhaps trying to throw a grenade (5-keys) and crouching (6-keys) at the same time? Keep in mind that you'd actually have to be doing a few extra things on top of all this to actually run into input limits on even basic keyboards.


There are really only two things this keyboard does outside of the general "typing in characters" stuff. The back left side includes a two-port USB 1.1 hub, and a headphone and microphone jack. The large, cloth-wrapped cable terminates in four connections?PS/2 for the keyboard functions, USB for the hub, and headphone/microphone for the audio jacks. You can't just plug in the USB and expect the keyboard to communicate with your PC that way?this is a PS/2 keyboard, though a PS/2 to USB adaptor is included. This is deliberate: A robust PS/2 buffer system is used to ensure that you can press a bunch of keys at the same time without locking up the input on your PC. Mash your hands down on all the keys at once, and they will all be transmitted to your PC. This is important in games where you're rapidly pressing multiple keys, sometimes with Shift or Control held down.

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  #2  
Old 12-03-2009
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Re: SteelSeries 7G Keyboard review

The most important feature of the 7G are its mechanical key switches. These bring an old-school keystroke to the keyboard. They are rated for up to 50 million strokes, so they will last for an extremely long time, but they are no-click switches. Keyboard layout is a bit of a personal preference issue. The 7G includes the large L-shaped Enter key many people like, and a single-width backspace key (we prefer the double-wide backspace key, because we make lots of mistakes). It's a standard straight layout, rather than the split "ergonomic" or hybrid curved layouts you often see today. Beyond that, it's nearly devoid of special features.



Included in the box is a plastic rest that slides over the keyboard and provides added support for your wrists. Considering the simplicity of the design it is exceedingly comfortable and really makes a difference over operating without it.Unlike many other modern keyboards, the SteelSeries 7G makes use of 18k gold plated mechanical switches. These switches offer amazing response time and provide remarkable feedback to the user. The linear switches offer an enormous life span of 50 million keystrokes. To put that number into perspective, the tactile mechanical switches (which provide a clicking sound when the key is actuated) have a life span of 20 million keystrokes and the more popular membrane keys have a lifespan of only 1-5 million keystrokes. Thanks to a combination of solid build quality and mechanical switches the SteelSeries 7G really is a keyboard that will last forever.

This key board is little difficult to operate. For example, Where you would normally find the Start button on a typical modern keyboard (between the left Ctrl and Alt keys), you'll see the SteelSeries key. Pressing this button does not open the Start menu or perform any other function in Windows. Rather, you use it in combination with the F1–F6 keys for Media Key functions (mute, volume up/down, pause, and next/previous track).The keyboard itself is rather small, with a large, flat, sturdy "overlay" of sorts to add a palm rest. It's flat and hard, which makes it durable and less comfortable than those keyboards with softer palm rests.

However, the one element that is most likely to turn away gamers is the keyboard’s hefty price tag. At around 150 bucks, the keyboard might be a hard sell to all but the most hardcore PC gamers, especially considering the lack of extra features. Still, if you’re looking for the best gaming keyboard around and are willing to pay a king’s ransom for it, the 7G might be right up your alley.
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  #3  
Old 12-03-2009
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Re: SteelSeries 7G Keyboard review

Nice keyboard.!! SteelSeries 7G. How much it cost in Indian Rupees ? i guess Logitech G15 will be cheper than that.
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  #4  
Old 12-03-2009
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Re: SteelSeries 7G Keyboard

It will cost you around 6800/- rupees. If possible you?ll want to try this keyboard before you buy it over a gaming keyboard from Razer or Logitech, as the typing experience is quite different.

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