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User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

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  #1  
Old 04-05-2011
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User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7
  

I have applied for windows 7 pack online, it took almost a month ago when I had ordered it for. As I hope my record of Windows 7 to arrive in the post I was asking about how to configure user accounts. I have been using an administrator account in Vista from many years, but I hear that's not such a good idea. So what do you recommend?

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  #2  
Old 04-05-2011
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Re: User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

If I would be in your place I would have done these things. Without a spare failures, less means to get to find a way to save files and reinstall. I'm sure this little first-hand experience and will not create the spare. I wonder if these lessons (with back up what he cannot lose) are lessons to be learned. Hope this helps you out. If it helps just reply back.
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  #3  
Old 04-05-2011
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Re: User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

I and my friend created our computers with Windows 7 original administrator account that is produced during the original setup system. Once completed, we allow the unknown administrator account (which tends to have some extra attributes that usually do not have administrator accounts), then create an administrator account more autonomous. That's three administrator accounts on all our machines. Once this is done, then a limited user account and added created in the end user's desktop.
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Old 04-05-2011
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Re: User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

Both Windows XP and Windows 7, I can set up an administrator account and a limited user account for each user. Only user accounts are limited to normal use. Is not uncommon to do as an administrator and is easier to administrator account, but that is hardly ever, especially with Windows 7 UAC. I use the Windows UAC essentially the same way to use her in a Linux / UNIX, only to do the things they need that level of permission, such as facilities, delete system files, etc, and running as a limited user means that at least some malware that is operated only at the level of permits, a limited user, so they can do less damage. Moreover, the malware is quite sophisticated these days, so it will not help things better designed smile.
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Old 04-05-2011
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Re: User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

It is also significant that the administrator account has a password, so that when it is running as a user and get a UAC application for at least a couple of reasons:
1. So if you get malware and manages to reach the level of administrator permissions, you must also come with a password and just reaching the threshold of the administration. Only increased the level which the malware has to reach before it can do maximum damage to the admin user can do.
2. When you get requests for UAC to operate as a normal user, if no administrator password is very easy to make a mistake in not read and fully understand the request, and just click "Yes" to close the UAC. If you have to enter a password, which slows you down, and I am more likely to read all the UAC and do the right thing according to what it says it is.
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  #6  
Old 04-05-2011
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Re: User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

So life has not really changed for me between Windows XP and Windows 7, except that it is much easier with Windows 7 to a normal user, and still be able to do management tasks. In Windows XP, I found myself having to change my normal user account and administrator account much, so I spent more time as an administrator which I prefer. With Windows 7, I can expend most of my time in my imperfect user account; very infrequently need to actually get into the administrator account. I would say that Windows 7 is safer as a result. Other security features have been added to Windows 7 as well but the malware is becoming more complicated.
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Old 07-05-2011
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Re: User Accounts Best Practice for Windows 7

If you requested more information on the number of administrator accounts do not need, what seems like a strange question for me, my response is a normal administrator account. There is another account, the most powerful administrator can configure and use if you're in big trouble, by booting in safe mode. With the administrator account that can do almost anything. I've been using Windows for a long, long time and I've never needed more than one user account administrator level, plus the "hidden" administrator account once or twice. These requires real attention and know exactly what you're doing, or you can make your system unbootable, but if you know exactly what you're doing and you cannot get permission to do so easily, is a Linux Live CD useful route. But be really careful with this, and make sure you have a recovery path in case you make a mistake.
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