Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Posts
    26

    ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

    Hello , I Have a Internet Problem , I cannot Access Google , Yahoo , So When i a Take a Look at the Host file There was A ::1 localhost unknown Entry in it , can You Tell me what is this ::1 localhost Entry , Is this Entry Harmful , Or this is the Real Caused of my Problem thanks in Advance

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    86

    Re: ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

    hello , The ::1 localhost entry is the Default Entry of Windows Host File

    Default content on Windows operating systems
    In Windows, the default hosts file contains (inactive) comment lines followed by IPv4 or IPv6 localhost entries, or it may be blank.

    # Comment
    127.0.0.1 localhost
    ::1 localhost
    So i Think You Should Let that ::1 localhost Entry As it is , the Reason for your Problem Could be Something Else

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    181

    Re: ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

    The Second Entry 127.0.0.1 (local host) entry is normally Present On Every System , The other entry which is ::1 localhost Entry seem to be bit strange and I Think this entry is Present in Windows Vista By Default , and it is Got Something to Do with IPV6 loopback.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Posts
    2,638

    Re: ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

    ::1 Localhost is the equivalent to 127.0.0.1 Localhost but using IPv6 protocol format , ::1 localhost is valid when Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is implemented on a system.

    IPv4 127.0.0.1
    IPv6 ::1

    "::" is an abbreviation for missing zeros, so this loopback entry really means

    0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001 localhost

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    1

    Re: ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

    A correct and direct answer. Excelent!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1

    Re: ::1 localhost Entry in hosts file

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve123 View Post
    ::1 Localhost is the equivalent to 127.0.0.1 Localhost but using IPv6 protocol format , ::1 localhost is valid when Internet Protocol version 6 (IPv6) is implemented on a system.

    IPv4 127.0.0.1
    IPv6 ::1

    "::" is an abbreviation for missing zeros, so this loopback entry really means

    0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0000:0001 localhost
    This subject is at the front of my mind as I am becoming aware of my host file in my XP Pro and its many capabilities.

    I, too, wondered about the IPv4 127.0.0.1 and IPv6 ::1 because I see some host files with and some without.

    I looked at my Local Area Connection properties and see that I have
    Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)

    I do not have the other kinds that other PCs have installed
    Internet Protocol (TCP/IPv4)
    Internet Protocol (TCP/IPv6)

    So, I wondered why my hosts file has the 127.0.0.1 for (TCP/IPv4) and the ::1 for Internet Protocol (TCP/IPv6), and my connection only has (TCP/IP) installed and not the other ones.

    Wiki states that:
    Correspondingly, the Internet Protocol (IP) specifies a loopback network. In IPv4 this is the network with the CIDR prefix 127/8 (RFC 3330). The most commonly used IP address on the loopback device is 127.0.0.1 for IPv4, although any address in the range 127.0.0.0 to 127.255.255.255 is mapped to it. IPv6 designates only a single address for this function, 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1 (also written as ::1), having the ::1/128 prefix (RFC 3513). The standard, officially reserved, domain name for these addresses is localhost (RFC 2606).

    I suspect that (TCP/IP) is some sort of original version for the DOD in the 60's (Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol)

    (TCP/IPv4) was made to allow for the increased capacity of users, and then (TCP/IPv6) came out in 2006 to replace version 4.

    The Internet Society claims

    IPV6: Making Room for the Next Billion Internet Users

    IPv6 is the next generation Internet Protocol (IP) address standard intended to supplement, and eventually replace, the IPv4 protocol most Internet services use today. To help ensure the continued rapid growth of the Internet as a platform for innovation, IPv6 tackles some of IPv4's shortcomings - most notably a limited amount of remaining addresses. While the techncial foundations of IPv6 are well established, significant work remains to deploy and begin using IPv6 capabilities.

    Because IPv6 is central to the continued growth and stability of the Internet, the Internet Society is working with its members and other organizations to promote its deployment by sharing information and helping to build the required operational capability among the Internet community.
    I am simply wondering about not having the 127.0.0.1 and ::1 in my hosts file, but I figure I'll just leave them be, sort of like an appendix. I really am ignorant of a lot of these things, so please forgive me, but I want to be clear about playing around with my host file and what the different parts of it mean.

    Thank you for being here, Techarena. I found this old thread just today, a couple of years after it was posted. It's funny how old info can be resurrected to come to the aid of a novice like me.

Similar Threads

  1. The DNS replacement for the Hosts file
    By Devabrata in forum Networking & Security
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 13-08-2010, 04:12 PM
  2. windows live hosts file
    By rizzamaula in forum Technology & Internet
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-02-2010, 05:11 PM
  3. Blocking Spyware Using the HOSTS File
    By Jannat in forum Tips & Tweaks
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-07-2009, 01:21 PM
  4. How to clean hosts file
    By AmdUser in forum Networking & Security
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29-06-2009, 10:34 PM
  5. include port in hosts file
    By John A Grandy in forum Windows Server Help
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15-04-2009, 07:10 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •