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  #1  
Old 29-10-2010
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Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 37
Hard Drives - ATA vs SATA

I am new to the hardware peripherals. I am having bit knowledge about the software and applications but newbie if hardware comes. The performance of computer systems has been increasing as faster processors, memory and video cards are constantly evolving. Commonly I have heard about the hard drives ATA and SATA. I am not having any knowledge about it. When I want to assemble the PC, I got question about these hard drives. So thought to take some notes from you members. Please tell me differences between the ATA hard drives and SATA hard drives.
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  #2  
Old 29-10-2010
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 184
Re: Hard Drives - ATA vs SATA

The ATA standard dates reverse to 1986 and is found on a 16-bit equivalent interface has undergone many changes since its introduction to augment the velocity and size of drives it can support. The latest standard is ATA-7 (introduced in 2001 by the T13 Technical Committee (the group accountable for the ATA standard)), which supports relocate rates up to 133MB/sec. This is expected to be the last update for the corresponding ATA standard. And in 2000 was that the parallel ATA standard was maxing out its limitations as to what I could knob. With data rates hitting the mark 133MB/sec in a parallel cable, are alluring all sorts of problems since of signal timing, EMI (electromagnetic interference) and other data integrity predicament, as industry leaders met and came up with a fresh standard known as Serial ATA (SATA). SATA has only been a few years, but is destined to develop into the norm for the reason that several advantages that will be addressed in the Technical Board.
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  #3  
Old 29-10-2010
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Join Date: Feb 2010
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Re: Hard Drives - ATA vs SATA

SCSI disks and controllers were developed for servers, 24x7, high availability systems. It supports long lengths of cable for connecting external devices. SCSI technology also incorporates a number of high level in order to server performance and scalability in multi-user, multi-threading (multi-thread) to maximize the transfer of data between memory and the controller and maximize the efficiency of their heads as they move disk. (They're smart drivers ability to mix and change the sequence of instructions received from the host machine in order to improve performance by ensuring the integrity of data.) The interconnection cable supports up to 15 SCSI devices per channel, thus making the SCSI is an excellent platform for mass storage systems. ATA technology, on the other front, was developed and optimized for desktop systems. Because desktop systems typically do not operate 24 hours 7 days a week, and usually do not get a use "hard" data access components used for building systems that ATA is not as robust as SCSI . However, the "sensitivity" of potential users of these systems has led to the engineering and manufacture of these components has been improving over the years for the simple reason of a bad image in a particular product or mark possible loss of data. The ATA protocol is much simpler than SCSI, having been designed for single-user operating systems and single-process and therefore lacks some of the characteristics of high-level SCSI technology. Finally, the ATA cable is very short: only 18 inches, and supports only two devices per cable which makes it totally unsuitable for large storage systems.
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  #4  
Old 29-10-2010
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Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 255
Re: Hard Drives - ATA vs SATA

Quote:
The ATA protocol is much simpler than SCSI, having been designed for single-user operating systems and single-process and therefore lacks some of the characteristics of high-level SCSI technology. Finally, the ATA cable is very short: only 18 inches, and supports only two devices per cable which makes it totally unsuitable for large storage systems.
At this point, RAID technology begins to play an important role in storage systems. Originally "invented" to ensure availability of data even in the case of a catastrophic failure of a disk, RAID has become a standard for storage subsystems in data centers where 24x7 availability is an essential requirement. RAID technology creates a system of redundant data in which the loss of an entire disk does not impact the availability of data. There are two factors working against ATA technology in front of the SCSI RAID:
  • The limitation to 18 inches of cable makes it very difficult to use large banks of high storage capacity, the limit of two discs by cable makes it very hard, so many drivers yield a reasonable limit to a maximum of 4 CDs.
  • And SCSI disks and drivers, have characteristics that do not have ATA drives, allowing for increased performance. Until very recently, were poorly implemented ATA RAID also giving a negative experience who used them and establishing a reputation for unreliability in these systems.
Recently, the quality and feature set offered by ATA RAID by several manufacturers has turned around perceptions that the market had in the past two years. Some manufacturers now offer ATA RAID SCSI model to obtain the benefits of this latest data transfers and ATA RAID controllers and offers features like "Dynamic Sector Repair", "Command Re-ordering", "Command Read "Back" and "Media Scan" to give these RAID features that were missing compared to SCSI RADI.
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  #5  
Old 29-10-2010
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Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 154
Re: Hard Drives - ATA vs SATA

SATA (Serial-ATA) mixed signal technologies series with ATA drives. This is important because it solves a number of problems affecting the use of ATA storage in really big systems, or storage needs are very high. The flexible cable is narrow and therefore does not affect ventilation systems can reach up to 1 meter size so the disks can already be hosted outside the server. This cable technology uses low-voltage signal (low-voltage) which allows for increased bandwidth without using expensive additional components. This technology also eliminates the requirement of having to use in the current +5 V power whose only purpose was to provide this voltage to the disks. In addition, we add to the above benefits that SATA has the property to avoid autoblocks: first, the connection between the disk and controller is a point-to-point connection instead of a bus. For each disc there is a single dedicated cable that connects to the controller. This will change the way you set up and develop due to a topology of point to point connection allows the use of controllers that can extract much more from ATA disks. Why? Precisely because this type of architecture allows concurrent access to all records, which is not possible in a bus architecture.
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